Elon Musk Laughs As Meta’s Chief AI Scientist Thinks It’s ‘Too Early To Worry’ About Regulating AI: ‘Prepare To Be’

Loading… Loading… Meta Platforms Inc.’s chief AI scientist, Yann LeCun, thinks it’s “too early to worry” about regulating bleeding-edge technology like artificial intelligence, and xAI founder Elon Musk thinks it will happen regardless. What Happened: AI pioneer LeCun took to X, formerly Twitter, to express his views on the ongoing debate about the regulation of…

Elon Musk Laughs As Meta’s Chief AI Scientist Thinks It’s ‘Too Early To Worry’ About Regulating AI: ‘Prepare To Be’

Loading… Loading… Meta Platforms Inc.’s chief AI scientist, Yann LeCun, thinks it’s “too early to worry” about regulating bleeding-edge technology like artificial intelligence, and xAI founder Elon Musk thinks it will happen regardless. What Happened: AI pioneer LeCun took to X, formerly Twitter, to express his views on the ongoing debate about the regulation of…

Azerbaijan’s Shusha to host next meetings of Turkic-speaking states in field of science and education

On June 1, the 8th Meeting of the Ministers in charge of Education of the Organization of Turkic States (OTS) and VII meeting of the Scientific Council of the International Turkish Academy will be held in Azerbaijan’s Shusha city, Ministry of Science and Education of Azerbaijan told APA.
The meetings will be attended by the delegations of the Organization of Turkic States, as well as member and observer states of the Turkish Academy.
Bilateral meetings between the states are also planned during the events.

Azerbaijan’s Shusha to host next meetings of Turkic-speaking states in field of science and education

On June 1, the 8th Meeting of the Ministers in charge of Education of the Organization of Turkic States (OTS) and VII meeting of the Scientific Council of the International Turkish Academy will be held in Azerbaijan’s Shusha city, Ministry of Science and Education of Azerbaijan told APA.
The meetings will be attended by the delegations of the Organization of Turkic States, as well as member and observer states of the Turkish Academy.
Bilateral meetings between the states are also planned during the events.

From wild to domesticated: Scientists reveal 100,000 years of continuous rice evolution

Topographic map showing the locations of the archaeological sites of (a and c) Shangshan and (b) Hehuashan. Credit: Zhang Jianping & Jiang Leping

According to a study published in Science, researchers have used phytolith analysis and other methods to reveal the continuous evolutionary history of rice from wild to domesticated over an astonishing span of 100,000 years, providing new evidence for understanding the development of human society and the origins of agricultural civilization, and confirming that China is the birthplace of rice (Oryza sativa).

Scientists hope to improve hurricane forecasting with new government investment

Atlantic hurricane season starts this week on June 1, and runs through November. NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, is predicting it’ll be a year of above-normal hurricane activity.

Climate change is making all kinds of extreme weather more common, and the Joe Biden administration recently announced $6.6 million in funding from the Inflation Reduction Act that will go toward efforts to improve weather forecasting.

Long-range, seasonal forecasts aren’t all that useful — at least not according to former FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate.

But once a storm forms, he said then the forecasts really matter. “It’s life or death. The better that forecast is and the more time we can give communities, the better the outcome.”

Forecasting has come a long way in the last few decades. Today, “the five-day forecast is as accurate, if not more accurate, than the three-day forecast was in 1987,” Fugate said.

That has saved both lives and money, according to Renato Molina at the University of Miami.

“Having accurate information, we estimate, has saved about 20% of the overall damages to property and crops in the last 20 years for the United States,” he said.

Even so, “extreme weather causes hundreds of deaths and hundreds of billion dollars in damage every year, noted Xuguang Wang at the University of Oklahoma, who will head up the new consortium that just got federal funding to do research to improve forecasts.

“Increasing weather extremes will threaten our sources of food, water, energy and economic well-being,” she said.

And, Wang added, more accurate forecasting can help reduce future damage.

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Scientists discover why we like listening to sad songs

Ever wondered why you keep listening to a song even though it makes you feel sad? So have scientists.A variety of explanations have been offered but a new study may have cracked the code and it’s a lot more simple than once thought.Researchers are proposing we listen to sad music simply because we find pleasure in feeling the sadness that such music evokes.“I guess part of being human is that we just can’t cope with the idea that there’s something strangely pleasurable about negative emotion,” says Emery Schubert at the University of New South Wales in Australia. “But what about people who actually just say: ‘Well, the reason I really love this piece of music is because it makes me sad?’ Who’s to say that they’re wrong?”Schubert asked 50 people to think about a piece of music they love but also consider sad; the answers ranged from Beethoven to Taylor Swift. Then, participants answered an online questionnaire about the emotions they felt while listening to their chosen piece.They were then asked to imagine if the sadness in the music was removed. Overall, they said this would make them appreciate the music less with 82 per cent saying the sadness added to their enjoyment.In another aspect of the experiment, Schubert asked another 53 people to identify a piece of music they love and would consider “moving”. These participants widely reported feeling sad while listening to their chosen piece, despite enjoying it.From these findings, Schubert says we often conflate the feeling of being “sad” and “moved” and as a result, experiencing a direct link between sadness and overall pleasure.However, some have questioned the accuracy of the study. Tuomas Eerola at Durham University said he doubts if we can “remove” sadness from a song that is generally considered sad. “The whole study rests on an assumption that listeners are capable of perfect dissection of their emotional causes from each other concerning their loved music,” he said.Sign upto our free Indy100 weekly newsletterHave your say in our news democracy. Click the upvote icon at the top of the page to help raise this article through the indy100 rankings.How to join the indy100’s free WhatsApp channel